You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘driver license’ tag.

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

Contact: Monserrat Mata

C: (919) 492-1334

E: monserrat@thencdreamteam.org

Local businessman is being deported!

Supporters will meet at 2pm at St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church in Simpsonville, SC

Greenville, SC – On September 6th, 2013, immigrant youth and community members will gather to urge Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to stop the deportation of Carlos Angel Garcia (A# 205-205-247), who is set to be deported on October 7th. If deported, Carlos will be separated from his family and youngest son Omar, who suffers from a chronic lung condition called Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia and developmental delay.

Carlos came to South Carolina from Mexico in 1999 and has lived here ever since. One night on his way back home from work, he drove into a driver license checkpoint and was arrested when he was asked for a license and he could not provide it. Carlos cannot get a driver’s license because South Carolina does not issue them to undocumented immigrants. According to the 2011 Morton Memo, he is a low-priority case and based on Acting ICE Director John Sandweg’s recent memo, Carlos’ deportation should be stopped immediately as he is the primary breadwinner for his 3 U.S. citizen children and his wife, Elizabeth.

WHEN: Friday, September 6th, 2013

TIME: 2PM

WHERE: 2252 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville, NC 29681

WHO: Organized by The North Carolina Dream Team as part of the Secure Your Own Community project, where immigrant families fight to stop deportations.

Petition: http://action.dreamactivist.org/southcarolina/carlos

###

The North Carolina Dream Team is the first undocumented youth – led organization in the Carolinas.

SIGN THE PETITION

Tell NC lawmakers to let undocumented immigrants drive again: http://bit.ly/reclaimnclicense

Tell NC lawmakers to let undocumented immigrants drive again: http://bit.ly/reclaimnclicense

In 2006, former Democratic Governor Mike Easley took away driver’s licenses from undocumented immigrants with taxpayer IDs. Since then, undocumented immigrants are paying the price for driving unlicensed, not knowing if they will come home to their families.

This year alone, we have fought alongside 8 immigrant families to stop the deportation of their loved ones. Maria Juana, Coach Salazar, Jose Ortiz, Fabiana Palomo, Isaias Valles, Isaias Morales, Oscar Canales and Erika Gonzalez all faced or are currently facing deportation for driving without a license.

Hardworking, tax-paying undocumented immigrants all over NC have made it very clear that they want and need to be able to legally drive again. The RECLAIM NC Act will give us an opportunity to do that. “How can they be willing to pay insurance premiums up front, have background checks run on them, and accept marked licenses to identify them as undocumented immigrants?” Because the price we are currently paying for driving unlicensed is even greater than that.

Maria Juana’s 2 US citizen daughters, Nayely and Blanca, can tell you about the price they’ve had to pay because their mother was driving unlicensed.  And Coach Salazar’s granddaughter. And Oscar’s baby Karen. Or Jose’s children, Joselyn, Gloria, and Luis, who recently had to miss school to personally ask their congressman to tell ICE that their daddy was just going to work to provide for them when he got into a minor accident and was arrested when the police arrived and Jose could not provide a driver’s license.

Coach Salazar was on his way home when he got pulled over and arrested for driving with an expired license. He was placed in deportation proceedings and given a final date to leave the country. With the help of an online petition and with his granddaughter by his side, his deportation was stopped.

Coach Salazar was on his way home when he got pulled over and arrested for driving with an expired license. He was placed in deportation proceedings and given a final date to leave the country. With the help of an online petition and with his granddaughter by his side, his deportation was stopped.

Sure, the driving permit is temporary and it’s marked. But it’s something. And to people who have nothing, something goes a long way.

Sign the petition to urge NC lawmakers to fix what should’ve never been broken. Tell them to give licenses back to undocumented immigrants: http://bit.ly/reclaimnclicense. 

Thank you for your support.

My name is Michelle Valladarez. I’m 20 years old and I’m undocumented. When I was eight years old, my father made some choices that put my brother and I in a dangerous situation in Honduras, where I was born. Daily I would get pulled out of class and questioned on my father’s whereabouts. We were no longer safe, not even in school. Fearing the worst, my mother decided to bring my brother to the United States. A year later, she sent for me. Luckily, my brother was able to enter the country by plane. I had to cross the border. At such a young age I had heard plenty about the terrible things that happen when trying to cross into the US. I was terrified. It took nearly two months to get to North Carolina, but finally I was reunited with my family.

I was excited to be here and excited to return to school. Since I had attended a bilingual school in Honduras, English was not a barrier for me. But even though I knew English and felt like I had a better future ahead of me, my excitement quickly died when I saw how difficult the life of an illegal immigrant is. Everywhere I went I was faced with racism and in school I got bullied plenty. It felt like it could not get any worse.. until I got to high school and had to start thinking about college that is.

Michelle Valladarez is an undocumented youth from Zebulon, NC. Her dream is to join the Air Force.

Michelle Valladarez is an undocumented youth from Zebulon, NC. Her dream is to join the Air Force.

My first two years of high school were fairly smooth. I had good grades and developed a love and appreciation for the military after I joined AFJROTC. Once I got to my junior year though, depression slowly began to sink in. It hit me that I might not be able to attend college or join the military. I reached out to recruiters and my school counselor in hopes of finding an answer. My school counselors had never been faced with this situation since most students live in the shadows and in fear because of their immigration status. They didn’t know what to do any more than I did. My parents began to share my frustration and fear. They suggested I go back to Honduras or to go study in Mexico. This is an issue that most immigrant students face. In their frustration, parents lose sight of what is truly important to us and instead of being supportive their solution to the problem is to send us back to our country of origin. I refused to give up. I refused to go back.

Even though my Junior year felt tough, I decided to suck it up and give my last year of high school the best I had. The biggest highlight of my senior year was becoming Group Commander of my JROTC Unit and exceeding expectations for our Unit inspection. That brought us to the top 10% of all AFJROTC units in the country. My dream of being in the military grew even more and I looked into the eligibility requirements for an Air Force Scholarship. Out of all the graduating Seniors, I was the only one who really had a chance at that scholarship. But there was one thing missing: papers. My heart was crushed and has been ever since.

After high school I went to college for a year. Wesleyan College, a private school, had given me a scholarship to cover some of the tuition costs and my step-dad agreed to pay what was left. My step-dad is also an illegal immigrant. His job wasn’t steady enough to afford my schooling, so I had to to quit for a year and work to pay off my tuition. As an illegal immigrant it is hard to find a decent job and sometimes you get stuck working for people that underpay you and don’t respect you. That’s why I am thankful for DACA and I can now have a better job and drive without fear. But DACA is only temporary and I still can’t afford paying out-of-state tuition. I also cannot enlist in the military despite having legal presence through deferred action. I also live in fear that my brother will also have to pay the price of being an undocumented student and that my mom or step-dad could get detained for driving with an expired license they can’t renew because NC doesn’t issue licenses to illegal immigrants.

Michelle graduated from Southern Nash High in 2011. Because she's undocumented, she could not get the Air Force scholarship despite the fact that she met all other requirements.

Michelle graduated from Southern Nash High in 2011. Because she’s undocumented, she could not get the Air Force scholarship despite the fact that she met all other requirements.

It has been rough and I’ve had to give up a lot of opportunities due to a lack of “legal status”. But I still have hopes that there will be a silver lining. I am not giving up, and neither should any undocumented youth. We deserve to get an education, to be able to have the job of our choice, and we deserve to have the option of joining the armed forces. But we have to fight for our rights. They’re not just gonna fall from the sky. And that is why I’ve decided to join the NC Dream Team and fight alongside other undocumented youth to improve the situation of our community.

I share my story with you to let you know that you are not alone. But above all to tell you that we must persevere in the face of adversity. I’m a Military DREAMer and my story does not end here.

Last Thursday, 6 – year old Luis missed school to make a personal visit to his representative’s office. Luis and his family were on a mission to get support from Congressman George Holding to stop the deportation of his father, Jose Ortiz. 

Image

 

Filled with hope that his representative would hear his plea for help, Luis walked into the office of Congressman Holding. Yet, he received everything but help. Instead of intervening in the case of his daddy, Congressman Holding’s staff ignored Luis. What is captured in the picture above is the representative’s staff talking down to Luis – a US citizen, telling him they will not help his father and he must leave before they call the cops.

Image

 

Luis and his family left soon after, but Luis’s aunt Mayra (who is a DACA holder) decided to stay to wait for a response from the representative. Refusing to leave, she was arrested. Mayra believes in the power of community and she and Luis and Jose and the rest of the family are going to continue to stand up until Jose’s deportation is stopped. 

What you can do to help:

SIGN and share the petition – http://bit.ly/noljosenc

CALL Congressman Holding’s office - 

Washington D.C. Office: 202-225-3032
Raleigh Office: 919-782-4400

Sample Script: “Hi, I’m calling to ask that Congressman Holding support Jose Guillermo Ortiz (A# 205-213-818) and stop his deportation set for today. Jose is the sole bread winner for his family that includes three US Citizen children. GOP leaders are working towards comprehensive immigration reform in Washington DC. Rep. Holding has a responsibility to keep this family together. Will he intervene to stop Jose’s deportation today?”

 

SIGN THE PETITION BY CLICKING HERE!

Does not having a driver’s license merit tearing this family apart? Despite having no criminal record, ICE is planning to deport Jose TODAY!

Can you help Luis, Joselyn, and Gloria keep their Daddy home? Their representative, Congressman George Holding, is their only hope.

Make a call and Sign the petition calling on Rep. Holding to Intervene on behalf of this family!

Call Congressman George Holding:

Washington D.C. Office: 202-225-3032
Raleigh Office: 919-782-4400

Sample Script: “Hi, I’m calling to ask that Congressman Holding support Jose Guillermo Ortiz (A# 205-213-818) and stop his deportation set for today. Jose is the sole bread winner for his family that includes three US Citizen children. GOP leaders are working towards comprehensive immigration reform in Washington DC. Rep. Holding has a responsibility to keep this family together. Will he intervene to stop Jose’s deportation today?”

Remember, the congressman has the power to address a letter to ICE asking to stop the deportation of Jose. He can also make a call to ICE or even issue a private bill to keep this family together.

Let us know what his office tells you! Leave a message on our facebook page or send an email to viridiana@thencdreamteam.org. Thank you for your support!

SIGN THE PETITION

Despite living in the United States for 14 years and a clean record, soccer Coach Eduardo Salazar (A# 200-717-517) is facing deportation in just FOUR days!

Coach Salazar graphic

Take action: SIGN the petition and call ICE @ 202-732-3000 or 202-732-3100!

Sample Script: “Hi, I was calling to ask that ICE stop the deportation of Coach Eduardo Salazar (A# 200-717-517). Coach Salazar has been living in the U.S. for over 14 years, coaching soccer and supporting his family. He is a low-priority for deportation. Please don’t deport Coach Salazar!”

Eduardo Salazar  is a beloved soccer coach, a boy scouts volunteer, and a loving grandfather. His family needs him here, especially his DACA approved son and granddaughter who is in critical medical condition. Make sure to take 2 minutes to call and sign his petition! Thanks for your support!

Call Wake County Detention Center at (919) 255-7111, Wake County ICE at (919) 255-7200 and DC ICE at 202-732-3000!

Sample Script: “Hi, I’m calling to ask that ICE drop the hold on Fabiana Palomo-Muniz (inmate #1064336). Fabiana is a committed member in her church and has been so for the past six years by coordinating a youth ministry program. She is an asset to this community. Please remove the ICE hold and release her immediately.”

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

The Durham community is at risk of losing yet another dedicated member to deportation. Fabiana Palomo Muniz (inmate #1064336) is a devoted and respected community member who has been in the US for the past eight years and has built a life here with her husband. She is involved with her church and for the past six years has coordinated the Latino Youth Ministry Program at Immaculate Inception Catholic church.

Fabiana Palomo-Muniz

Fabiana Palomo-Muniz

Fabiana was on her way to a training for youth facilitators through her church when she got into a minor traffic accident. When police arrived she was ticketed for the accident and for driving without a license. Fabiana then asked for an interpreter and even tried calling friends of hers to help interpret. However, no one was available and so communication with the police was not clear. 

Fabiana understood that it was fine for her to leave since she had already been given a ticket. Such was not the case and when she tried to leave police arrested her. She is now at Wake County Detention Center facing charges of resisting a police officer with an ICE hold. 

This is a misunderstanding and dedicated community members like Fabiana should not be torn away from their loved ones. It is also important to note that a driver’s license is not an option for Fabiana because the state of North Carolina currently does not allow the undocumented community to apply for one.
Fabiana and her loved ones need your help to get her released! Call ICE at Wake County Detention Center and urge them to drop the ICE hold!

ACT NOW!
Call Wake County Detention Center at (919) 255-7111, Wake County ICE at (919) 255-7200 and DC ICE at 202-732-3000!

Sample Script: “Hi, I’m calling to ask that ICE drop the hold on Fabiana Palomo-Muniz (inmate #1064336). Fabiana is a committed member in her church and has been so for the past six years by coordinating a youth ministry program. She is an asset to this community. Please remove the ICE hold and release her immediately.”

April 11, 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jose Torres-Don

Mobile: 512-744-8804
Email: jose.torresdon@gmail.com

 

NC DREAM Team Supports RECLAIM NC Act:

 Coming Out of the Shadows

RALEIGH, NC—The North Carolina DREAM Team (NCDT) supports Republican led initiatives for continued dialogue on immigration matters in North Carolina.  On Wednesday, Republican Representatives Warren, Jordan, Brown and Collins filed House Bill 786-the RECLAIM NC Act that includes a process for bringing undocumented immigrants in NC out of the shadows through a driving permit. As undocumented people we are living through the consequences of the failed promises in the past decade from the national Democratic Party on immigration reform. We welcome this initiative from NC Republicans as a signal of their better understanding of the value in this opportunity to move North Carolina forward in a way that is inclusive of the Hispanic Community. We call on the leadership of this state, both Republicans and Democrats, to resist the bullying tactics of extreme anti-immigrant factions and arrive at reasonable policies in the best interest of the state’s economy and public safety.

In the summer of 2006 NC changed its laws that made it impossible for our undocumented families to obtain or renew driver’s licenses. This change was made under the leadership by then Democratic Governor, Mike Easley, who signed the Technical Corrections Act on August 27th, 2006. In the years that have followed, undocumented community members have been and continue to be deported as a result of not being able to produce a driver’s license. We intend to fully engage in conversation on initiatives from both, Republicans and Democrats, for the possibility of a driving permit. All legislators must propose and pass meaningful legislation that elevates outcomes over false rhetoric of hope. We welcome all initiatives independent of party affiliation.

To address the concerns that this proposal sounds like a round ‘em up and deport ‘em type of policy, our everyday lives remind us that this is vigorously happening already to our community under the leadership of the national Democratic Party. NCDT member, Viridiana Martinez, 26, previously detained in an immigrant detention center in Florida experienced first-hand such destructive policies of the Obama administration.  Martinez states, “there is a cruel deceptiveness in the “low priority for deportation” directive from Obama that is nothing more than a talking point… we seek an alternative to the status quo”. Currently NCDT is rallying to stop the Deportation of dedicated grandfather and Boy Scouts soccer coach, Eduardo Mireles Salazar (Alien Number: 200-717-517), who has been ordered deported from North Carolina as a result of merely driving without a license. For Coach Salazar and the many others that go unnoticed, we support Representatives Warren, Jordan, Brown and Collins in their initiative to seek better solutions.

We are aware there are problematic provisions within the proposed bill and we intend to provide our voice to that discussion so that there is understanding of the community directly affected. The NC DREAM Team looks forward to having a bigger conversation about the enlightened self-interest for Republicans in NC to align with the national leadership of the GOP that has signaled a more reasonable approach in dealing with immigration and with that fostering a better relationship with a growing Hispanic political base.

###

The NC DREAM Team is an organization composed of undocumented immigrant youth and allies who are dedicated to the creation of a sustainable, community-led immigrant rights movement in North Carolina. We aim to help undocumented youth recognize their individual and collective power to activate their communities.

For all media inquiries, contact Jose Torres-Don at (512) 744-8804.

NCDOT announced today DACA licenses will no longer have a pink stripe, will keep "No Lawful Status"

NCDOT announced today DACA licenses will no longer have a pink stripe, will keep “No Lawful Status”

“No Lawful Status” with “Legal Presence”? Regular license instead of pink license? None of that matters because we are no longer afraid! 

by Jose Torres-Don

As an undocumented DACA eligible youth I welcome this license as an opportunity. For us it has not been about what color our drivers licenses are. The truth is that our fight for the DACA drivers licenses has been more about empowerment in our everyday lives to take control of who we are and not let anyone tell us what our place is or is not.

We are taking these licenses knowing that the biggest and most important battle is the one in our head that leads us to our own individual liberation independent of politicians, policies (or lack of), anti-immigrant groups and anything and anyone in between.

Ultimately our perseverance comes from knowing that we are valuable and that no matter how negative the anti-immigrant rhetoric is, we are human beings and we will no longer engage in the dehumanizing process of living in the “shadows”…something that politicians on both sides of the aisle have advanced. We do not need a specific color on a license to tell us, and the rest of North Carolina, who we are. We are undocumented, we are no longer afraid and do not wish to hide that neither by being silent nor by being issued a regular license.

270896_10101103583257128_1560605190_n

We seek to drive without fear, to challenge the idea that we should remain in the shadows and to challenge the idea that this is about an “us” vs “them”. Instead, we want to have a real and honest conversation about how being undocumented is a problem and how we can find equitable and reasonable solutions that work for North Carolina. We look forward to having a bigger conversation about the enlightened self-interest for people in public office to not be bullied by radical anti-immigrant groups and instead see the value in moving North Carolina forward that is inclusive of the Hispanic community. We cannot promise the “hispanic vote”, we won’t promise that to any party, however, the national leadership of the GOP has signaled where the starting line is for Republicans of reasonable minds. It starts with seeing the value of the opportunity over the issue of immigration and proactively bidding for a broader base.

image

Hello! My name is Alejandra. I live in Liberty, NC. I’m 18 years old and I am undocumented.

I was brought to this country when I was only 13 months old. I’ve been here basically all my life and now I have the chance to help my family! My mom has been driving without a driver’s license since 2007. In these past six years, she hasn’t been able to go out anywhere without being afraid of getting pulled over. She’s gotten pulled over twice already. But what can she do? She has to work in order for us to eat and she can’t be looking for a ride all the time. Everyone has their own life and we can’t always be looking for people to take us places.
This is why I can’t wait to get my pink license! I don’t like the idea that everyone who I show my driver’s license to will know my immigration status. The truth is I’m tired though. I’m tired of hiding that I am undocumented. My immigration status does not determine my worth. As of March 25th, I too will drive without fear! I wont be scared when a cop pulls up behind me on my my way to work, afraid he’ll check my plate to find that I’ve been previously pulled over for no driver’s license . More importantly, I’ll be able to drive my mom where she needs to go. Pink stripe or no pink stripe, I’m ready for my driver’s license!

Donate & Subscribe

Donate here. Donations help us travel around the state and purchase materials for actions and events. You can also subscribe to our mailing list.

@NCDREAMTeam

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,466 other followers

%d bloggers like this: