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On Tuesday, January 22, immigrant youth from all over NC will march to the NC Department of Transportation building to demand they overturn the ban on driver licenses for DACA holders. Click here for details. If you can’t make it tomorrow, you can help by signing the petition and making calls to NC DMV commissioner Eric Boyette. A sample script is included in the petition so you can leave the commissioner a clear message that you stand with immigrant youth. He has the power to fix this and should do so immediately. Having licensed drivers makes our roads safer and, in turn, our state. Immigrant youth who have been granted deferred action have been given a permit to work, let them drive!

Meet Jackie Aguilar, a dreamer from Raleigh and one of the organizers of today’s event. She’s protesting not just for herself, but for her friends as well.

“Many of my friends were already approved for DACA. We were given a permit to work, let us drive!” – Jackie

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DREAMer Jackie Aguilar, Class of ’08

My name is Jackie. I’m a dreamer who grew up in Raleigh since I was 8 years old. I graduated from William G. Enloe High School in 2008 with honors. Even though I have had a difficult life after high school and struggled through a society that doesn’t accept me, I still hold aspirations of getting a degree and a job I deserve. To me, nothing is more important than an education and I have always demonstrated that to my younger siblings. I try to be the best for them. Getting a driver license will make my life easier. It will allow me the ability to drive to school and to work without fear of getting pulled over and arrested for driving without a license. Here in Raleigh, people are deported when they’re arrested for driving without a license. I helped organize Tuesday’s rally because, as Attorney General Cooper already clarified, DACA holders are entitled to a driver license. To the NC DMV: Stop holding our licenses hostage. We have been given a permit to work, let us drive! If you stand with us, sign the petition demanding we get our license back. You can help by making calls to NC DMV commissioner Eric Boyette too. Thank you!

Sign the PETITION to get our driver license back by clicking here!

La marcha sigue en pie! Nos vemos mañana, Martes, afuera de las oficinas del Departamento de Transportacion. Mas detalles:

Cuando: Martes, 22 de Enero a las 9am
Donde: 1 S. Wilmington St. Raleigh, NC

*Bring your banners, caps and gowns, and matracas.
**Parking: Street parking or on-site parking decks at 120 S. Wilmington St. and also 115 S. Wilmington St. ($2/hour).

Para mas informacion, favor de contactar a:
Jacki Aguilar: 919-395-8458
Jose Rico: 919-802-0508

 

After weeks of going back and forth on the recent change in policy by the DMV to not grant drivers licenses to immigrant youth that benefit from President Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), it has become evident that the NC Department of Transportation does not intend to change back its policy. They will continue to hold our drivers licenses hostage.

Only weeks ago, the DMV stated that they would stop issuing drivers licenses until they heard from the opinion of Attorney General Roy Cooper. Late last week, Cooper issued a statement explaining that DACA beneficiaries not only hold legal presence, but that the state is required to issue us driver licenses:

“It is therefore our opinion that individuals who have been granted deferred action under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy directive are lawfully present in the United States during the period of deferment. As such, N.C. Gen. Stat. 20-7(s), which states that DMV shall issue a drivers license of limited duration to person who present valid documentation demonstrating deferment and meet all other statutory requirements, requires that such licenses be issued.”

Following Attorney General Cooper’s clarification, US Citizen & Immigration Services (USCIS) also issued a formal statement in regards to driver licenses for DACA recipients:

“Deferred action is a discretionary determination to defer removal action of an individual as an act of prosecutorial discretion. For purposes of future inadmissibility based upon unlawful presence, an individual whose case has been deferred is not considered to be unlawfully present during the period in which deferred action is in effect. An individual who has received deferred action is authorized by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to be present in the United States, and is therefore considered by DHS to be lawfully present during the period deferred action is in effect.”

http://www.uscis.gov/images/layout/logo.jpg

According to recent USCIS data,  as of this month there are 14,777 immigrant youth that were given deferred action in the state of North Carolina.

However, it has become apparent to us that our state’s Department of Transportation does not care much for these clarifications. They continue to discriminate DACA youth and have given no sign of changing back the DMV policy that keeps us from obtaining a driver license. They have also found an ally in their bullying of immigrant youth with Lt. Governor Dan Forest.

Nolicenses4illegalers

A recent statement given by NC Lt. Governor Dan Forest expresses:

“A person entering the United States illegally should not be afforded the privileges reserved for US citizens..”

This is yet another attack on us. You and I have a choice to make: Will we remain silent or fight back?

Here at the NC DREAM Team, we have heard our community loud and clear. We have received your calls and read your emails and messages that:  We NEED to fight back! We WANT to fight back! We WILL fight back!
DMVFAIL

Here’s what we need to do:

1. Sign the petition and make calls:

http://action.dreamactivist.org/northcarolina/license/

2. Come to the protest organized by local immigrant youth TOMORROW:

When: Tuesday, January 22 @ 9am
Where: 1 S Wilmington St. Raleigh, NC

*Bring your banners, caps and gowns, and matracas.
**Parking: Street parking or on-site parking decks at 120 S. Wilmington St. and also 115 S. Wilmington St. ($2/hour).

For more info on the protest please contact:
Jacki Aguilar: 919-395-8458
Jose Rico: 919-802-0508

See you there!

VDARE, one of the hardest-nosed anti-immigrant screed machines out there is calling out the Tanton Network for being “cowardly conservatives” unwilling to own their racism. After a lengthy piece on the founding of FAIR and its white supremacist connections in the New York Times, its founder and architect of the “Tanton Network”, John Tanton, stepped down.

According to VDARE, this aquiecense, the fear of being called a racist–or being associated with racism–is unpatriotic. True “immigration patriots” like themselves have to be willing to stand up for what they believe.

What Bush—and all pusillanimous progressives and cowardly conservatives—are doing is valuing the opinions of their enemies. They are hoping that by paying a sort of Danegeld to the “anti-racist” left, they will stop being hated.

It’s not going to happen.

While VDARE may not think so, being a racist is bad–it’s an outlook that is no longer tolerable. But I’m not going to go into what the right thinks about tolerance, other than to say that free speech ought to be a defense of last resort rather than the knee-jerk response it goes for today.

Before getting too off-topic, this little dust-up started when IMAGINE2050 protested against the FAIR-affiliated Progressives for Immigration Reform. Tanton had once urged progressive groups like the Sierra Club and Planned parenthood to turn against immigrants in the name of population control. PFIR is a movement in that same spirit. VDARE buttresses that strategy by scapegoating immgrants as the reason for higher poverty among African-Americans on average. Why African-Americans should accept their position on the bottom of America’s economic totem pole, VDARE leaves as a given. Nevermind that 95% of the CEOs of Fortune 500 companies are white–the would-be black CEOs didn’t lose their jobs to immigrants. Being progressive while being retrogressive on immigration fails to see how it fits into the bigger picture.

After the Georgia protest against HB 87, in which undocumented youth gained the support of serveral black Civil Rights leaders, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution ran an article making the same argument against black-brown unity that VDARE is making. The logic behind it new—Arizona Neo-Nazi JT Ready suggested that a white-black alliance be made to fight the higher-priority Jews. In this period of ever-shifting racial, ethnic and geographic boundaries, nativists are having a little bit of an identity crisis themselves, or at least trying to make sense of a world in which “native” means much less than it used to.

The author of the VDARE post, James Fulford, believes that to harden onesself against insult, “you need to have a certain contempt for the insulter”. Lucky for us, it’s easy to have contempt for racists. Luckily also: most of society agrees.

By Alicia Torres

Upon the civil disobedience that took place last week in Indianapolis, Indiana, questions have arisen about whether such actions are necessary and responsible. The first thing that critics must remember is that deciding to participate in a civil disobedience action is a decision that is not taken lightly by either the participants or the organizers. As undocumented participants in a civil disobedience, you go in with the understanding that you are risking it all to gain it all. As organizers, you understand that the fate of the participants lay solely in your hands. Before a civil disobedience action is considered, there are natural steps that are taken–petitions, meetings, rallies, marches and the many other things that we as undocumented youth have done since 2001 in support of the DREAM Act. But when anti—immigrant bills are passed in your home state, there is an overnight sense of urgency that overflows your body. Suddenly petitions, rallies, and marches are not sufficient and local polititans start getting meaner and nastier. That was the case in Indiana.

Erick, Omar, Lupe, Paola and Sayra were arrested in Gov. Daniels’s office in protest of two immigration laws that passed in the state legislature: Senate Bill 590, which is similar to Arizona’s SB1070 and would make local police into de facto immigration agents; and HB1402, which would force undocumented Indiana students to pay out-of-state tuition rates which are triple the cost of in-state rates. The undocumented youth demanded a meeting with Daniels, which he denied. The Indiana civil disobedience was a response to the anti-immigrant sentiment that was about to be signed into law by Daniels. The Indiana undocumented community was and is in a state of urgency. I am not saying that petitioning, rallying and marching do not work because they do, but what I am saying and will stand behind is the fact that presently in our undocumented community there is an unprecedented urgency for survival.

When Arizona SB1070 copy cats are being introduced left and right and state participation in programs such as secure communities and 287g is becoming the norm we need to be ready not just to respond but to anticipate and counteract the anti-immigrant domino effect. To do this, we, the undocumented immigrant community, need to lose our fear and be ready to take the bull by its horns. So to the question of whether civil disobedience is necessary, my response is yes, because presently we are living in a continuous state of fear and with the feeling of the big man’s boot on our back.

Being undocumented is not just a status; it is a constant imposition of limitations on our lives. When you ask yourself: Am I we tired of living in fear? Am I tired of being oppressed? Am I ready to risk it all to gain self-liberation and you find yourself answering YES, then you will know that a civil disobedience is necessary. I am not advocating for you to go out and get arrested for a cause because there are definite consequences that need to be considered on an individual basis and responsible planning that must take place. What I am advocating is for people to think twice before they place judgment on civil disobedience actions and their organizers. As an undocumented person I do not want to see anybody get deported or put themselves in the line of fire and that is why my hat is off to those six undocumented students in Indiana who have showed us what courage looks like and what it means to be fighting for the right to a better life in this country that we call home. Thank you to the Indiana 6 and the Georgia 7; and to those of us around them lets be critical of our own personal judgment to civil disobedience participants and organizers.

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