You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘civil disobedience’ tag.

 

Viridiana was able to call in live on to the Democracy Now! program to speak about Broward Transitional Center where she is currently detained.

Listen in here for a longer, more in-depth interview.

And be sure to sign here to demand a full and complete review of each detainee at the Broward Detention center and that all low-priority detainees immediately be released and their cases administratively closed.

by Alicia Torres

Late on Tuesday night during my brother’s usual facebook scan for the latest on people’s life, he came across a post that he had to share with me. It was a post written by an ally (a person who holds US citizenship but is supposed to be a friend to the undocumented community) in which she vented her disagreement with the latest civil disobedience that took place in Arizona.

Although there are many things she wrote with which I disagree I want to focus on this one liner that she wrote: “I thought there was an internal agreement that the people protesting would always be college graduates” wrote advocate and ally, Carmen Cornejo. To me this statement echoes nothing more than a very big disconnect from the reality that we the undocumented community are living in. Currently only 12 states allow for undocumented youth to pay in-state tuition, of which Arizona is not one, and the number of states banning undocumented students from enrolling in colleges and universities is on the quick rise. The reality is that the majority of undocumented youth are not college graduates, meaning there is not that many to go around for our protests. But more importantly, you do not need a college degree to understand, to see, to feel the injustice that is being committed against us, our families, and our community. All it takes for many of us is to look across our dinner table and see our parent’s exhausted face sitting across from us. You may work with undocumented immigrants and even be friends with us but you will never feel the urgency with which we are currently living. This urgency that I speak of is one of needing to stop the injustices that on a daily basis plague our undocumented communities. This urgency is what pushes undocumented youth to drop the fear and come out as undocumented and unafraid. This urgency is what pushed the Arizona 6 to tell Arpaio we’re undocumented unafraid and we’re not backing down.

When a youth decides to be a apart of any coming out action it is the obligation of those around him or her to play a fully supportive role. You don’t have to agree but you do have to show support, and for the record questioning an act through which self empowerment will be the end result is not being supportive. For many of us it is our experience of coming out that allows us to meet eye to eye with our biggest fear and defeat it. There is no right or wrong age or level of education or criminal record background to come out, we come out because we have have been pushed to our limits and WE HAVE A CHOICE in either fighting back or curling in the corner. We the undocumented community are tired, angry, fed up and ready to fight back. We are from all walks of life. Some with higher education, 67% without one because we are being denied equal access to education but we all have a fire in our hearts and eyes that will burn until the chains of fear that have been placed upon our community are broken. We will do this through the self empowerment of our community. We are learning and teaching other undocumented youth along the way to own our voices, our stories, our lives. We are coming out as UNDOCUMENTED and UNAFRAID in a city near you.

Here in north Carolina, another state that does not offer instate tuition, the younger generation of undocumented youth are taking their cues from those that have decided to step up and fight back. They have experienced living in the shadows of not only a legal system but an educational system as well and and they are not willing to take it anymore. That is why they have decided to drop the fear and come out as undocumented and unafraid. For them it is their first step in the fight to regain their humanity and empower
themselves and their peers. We’re not rubbing politicians’ bellies, we’re taking direct action. These youth should be encouraged to come out and if and when they are ready to take that next step we’ll be there to encourage them and not slam another door in their face.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 29, 2022

Contact: Viridiana Martinez    (919)704-0599

dreamteamnc@gmail.com

ncdreamteam.org

Youth Come Out as UNDOCUMENTED and UNAFRAID in NC Legislature

 

Undocumented Youth Face Anti-Immigrant Committee in NC Legislature

As the newly developed Standing House Committee on the State’s Role on Immigration works on drafting a comprehensive anti-immigrant plan for NC, undocumented youth are determined to drop the fear and face the members of this committee by showing up at the committee’s meeting and making themselves heard.

“My name is Uriel Alberto; I am undocumented, unafraid, and unashamed!” Uriel is an undocumented youth who is determined to be present at the committee’s meeting. When asked why he simply states “I refuse to be bullied and intimidated by this committee and choose to empower my community.”

This will be the third of a total of six meetings that this committee will have. These committee meetings are open to the public and like in the past two meetings a large number of anti-immigrant supporters are expected. The environment that these undocumented youth will be in will be a hostile one.

NC DREAM Team and other undocumented youth will show presence in tomorrow’s meeting in an effort to stop the spread of Arizona SB 1070 copycats across the south and a possible similar bill draft for NC.

Where: 16 West Jones St. Raleigh, NC 27601; ROOM 643 Legislative Office Building,

When: 1:00 pm, 2-29-2012

What: Undocumented Youth Face Anti-Immigrant Committee in NC Legislature

Who: NC DREAM Team

# # #

Yesterday, 13 undocumented leaders took a stand and in Alabama, risking deportation, against fear caused by the state’s harsh, anti-immigrant laws. They fought back against the oppressive shadows of fear and silence by raising their voices so that others will take heart and take action.

Local news channel WSFA 12 pulled NCDT’s own Viridiana aside to talk about what happened and why these brave leaders undertook yesterday’s action. Check out this powerful footage of what she had to say.

Also, you can support the AL13 by pitching in to their bail fund- every bit helps.

Media Advisory            Tuesday, November 15th

Contact: Mohammad Abdollahi  | Cell: 734.262.9705

Email: mo@dreamactivist.org

Contact: Dayanna Rebolledo | Cell: 313.319.5524

 

Historical Civil Disobedience in Montgomery, Alabama:

Undocumented Parents, 55, 39, 30 and 25 Risk Arrest

Four parents join dozens of undocumented youth in demanding HB56 author—State Senator Beason— stop the hate

 

***Watch Live at 3:00pm EST - http://bit.ly/livealundoc ***

MONTGOMERY, Ala.— 12 undocumented immigrants participate in an act of civil disobedience today in front of the Alabama State Capitol. They will publicly declare their undocumented status in defiance of HB 56, which is considered to be the harshest anti-immigrant bill in the country.

“We want to remind the immigrants of this state that they have a voice and it’s time to use it,” said Belen Rebelledo, an undocumented mother of three.  “We are here to stop Alabama from once again trying to turn the power of the state against those who live in it.”

Participants for today’s event have come together from all over the country to stand in solidarity with the community in Alabama. “What happens to one of us affects all of us regardless of where we live” said Alma Diaz, an undocumented immigrant who arrived in the U.S. at the age of 22.  Now 30 Alma fights for her community and is taking this risk, knowing she could be arrested and deported, because doing nothing is no longer an option. “What has hiding in the shadows gotten us? We must fight back; it is the only way to end the pain we see in our communities.”

When:       November 15th at 2:00pm: Alabama House of Reps

11 South Union Street, Montgomery, AL 36130-2102

What:  Undocumented parents and youth deliver a letter to state legislators demanding a change in anti-immigrant rhetoric and wait for response.

Where:  In front of Alabama State Legislature.

Who:  Martin Unzueta, 55; Belen Rebelledo, 39; Alma Diaz, 30; Jaime Guzman, 25, of Portland, OR; Catalina Rios, 19, of Detroit, MI; Ernesto Zumaya, 25, of Los Angeles, CA;  Myasha Arellano, 18, of San Fernando Valley, CA; Krsna Avila, 23, of Oakland, CA; Fernanda Marroquin, 22, of Philadelphia, PA; Cesar Marroquin, 21, of Philadelphia, PA; and Cynthia Perez, 27, of Indianapolis, IN.

Martin Unzueta, an undocumented immigrant living in the U.S. for the past 17 years is taking action to confront the lies; “The Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement lie because they are hurting our communities with their actions. We are doing civil disobedience because we are not afraid of confronting those who lie.”

Jaime Limon-Guzman, an undocumented parent from Oregon is in Alabama to protect his family; “At 12, my parents brought me to the U.S.to give me a better life.  I worry everyday for my 2 year old daughter, I am now taking the same risk my parents took to give her a better and more secure future.

###

The Alabama Youth Collective is an undocumented youth-led organization working to better the lives of immigrants in the state of Alabama.  The Youth Collective firmly believes in the principles of non-violent direct action.

 

Profile of parents participating in today’s civil disobedience

Belen Rico came to the U.S. 11 years ago to provide her children with a more promising future. Now 39 years old and a mother of three, she works multiple jobs in order to provide for her family. After spending time with immigrant communities inAlabama, she has witnessed first-hand how HB 56 is tearing families apart. Recognizing that she cannot sit by inDetroit while such injustice is happening inBirmingham, Belen feels that the time has come to take a stand. In her words, “As parents, we need to come out of the shadows and walk side by side with our children. We need to stand united so that our message can be strong and clear: we will no longer remain silent.”

Martin Unzueta has been in the United States for 17 years. A resident of Chicago,Illinois, the 55 year-old has been a long-time community organizer and now advocates for the rights of workers at the Chicago Community and Workers’ Rights Center. Martin refuses to stay silent while 1,100 people are deported every day. He recognizes that the majority of them are victims of Secure Communities, which criminalizes the families and workers like him who form the backbone of this society. He is taking this risk because he is tired of seeing his children suffer and is tired of the lies of ICE. Martin is fighting back because he will not be afraid of those who lie to entire communities under the guise of freedom.

Alma Diaz has lived in America for almost a decade. From Cincinnati,Ohio, she has worked hard to achieve the elusive American Dream. At 30 years old,Alma is a wife and mother, a student at Cincinnati State Community College, where she studies Business Management, and a community volunteer at the Cincinnati Interfaith Workers Center, where she educates her fellow community members about their rights and fights to minimize wage theft. She has demonstrated, through her actions, her value of service to the community and of education. With these same values in mind,Alma is taking action in Alabama. She hopes to empower other undocumented immigrants to come out of the shadows and take a stand, in order to keep their families together and hold America accountable to its own values.

Jaime Limon-Guzman came to the United States at age 12 from Mexico. Jaime currently works as an organizer and mentor in his community in Oregon. As a young parent of a 2 year old, He fears he will be separated from his daughter due to his immigration status. Jaime decided to risk deportation by sharing his story in Alabama in hopes to put an end to law that dehumanizes his community.

 

Remaining profiles will be loaded on www.dreamactivist.org    |    @dreamact

By Justin Valas

One thing that we have [sadly] gotten used to as organizers is that sometimes, the voices of the undocumented are overlooked, ignored or misrepresented. That’s part of why we, as the NC Dream Team exist. Take, for example, September 6th, 2011.

Seven undocumented youth from across the state came out of the shadows, dropped the fear and disclosed their immigration status in a very public way. Listening to their stories and their reasons for taking this brave action painted a complex picture of the harsh reality that faces undocumented immigrants in North Carolina and around the country. They came out decrying a community college system that throws undocumented youth to the back of the bus- if not under it. Charging them four times the tuition rate [regardless of their ability to show high school diplomas or tax records that would provide in-state tuition for their documented and citizen peers] while demanding that they scavenge through the post-registration leftovers. They also called out policies and programs that blur the line between local police officers and federal immigration agents- 287g and “Secure” Communities.

It’s a shame that the complexity of the reality that they tried to expose proved too complex. Many in the media referred to the act of civil disobedience as a “DREAM Act Rally”. Potential allies looked at what happened and saw it as a chance to express their solidarity with the passage of the DREAM Act.

Don’t get me wrong- we’re not opposing the DREAM Act. Believe me, we’re not. But the reason I bring this up is because listening – really listening – to the voices of these brave youth is important. They are trying to expose their reality, the reality that we all live in- consciously or not. It is a reality that our government pursues most intensely when no one is watching.

I bring this up now because the same day that these youth undertook this action, they met another undocumented person who was caught up by the same policies they were fighting against. Javier Santos was not surrounded by hundreds of supporters at the time of his arrest. He was unceremoniously picked up by the police dragnet and received very different treatment from the youth arrested that day. While they are free today, Javier continues to sit in a detention center awaiting deportation. ICE kept him separate from his wife and children while his wife brought their third daughter into the world. He has been unable to provide for his family for the past month because of these community destroying policies. All this while President Obama claims that “low priority” cases [like Javier's] would not face deportation.

It is this reality that the undocumented youth were calling your attention to. It is Javier who needs your support and attention as much as they needed it on September 6th. Please, take action today to help bring Javier home to his family. Signing this petition is important. Making the phone calls is important. Combined, they will take less than 5 minutes of your day. You can help this father see his newborn daughter for the first time- will you?

Students have chained themselves to the chairs of a board meeting of the Tuscon Unified School District in defense of high school Ethnic Studies program, derailing the introduction of a measure that would eliminate it.


J.Valas

By José Torres-Don

Last Thursday’s vigil was an opportunity for all of us to reflect on our current situation in North Carolina as an immigrant community. The vigil was held at the same place where just a year before three young women declared a hunger strike challenging all of us to believe and push for our dreams. At the time, they demanded for Senator Hagan to hear their frustration. Needless to say, the Senator did not measure up to the trust and confidence placed in her. However, this time around we came together in support of the seven undocumented youth, two from the NC DREAM Team, who last Tuesday intentionally risked deportation in Atlanta, Georgia through a civil disobedience action. The seven youth demanded that Georgia State University President refuse the ban on undocumented students attending the university. This was the first direct action by undocumented youth since the DREAM Act failed to pass in the Senate. It was an important one-since then our immigrant communities have been under attack at the local level, where we feel it the most, and the only support we hear from a supposedly immigrant-friendly administration is an irresponsible and faint commitment to not deport us.


J. Valas

More than anything, the vigil was a celebration of the undocumented youth empowerment felt throughout the state. We all felt the risk of the action taken, but as we stood there united, we understood clearly the greater risk in maintaining the status quo. We were all reminded that in North Carolina, our urgency is such that our own friends are willing to risk it all in order to give us all our voice back and to not be afraid to stand up and speak our own truth. We reflected on their strength to look fear in the eye and push and lead us to understand our own power. We felt it. We understood our cause at its very core. We welcomed our responsibility to keep pushing ahead for undocumented youth and our parents so that we heal through self-empowerment. This was especially felt when Jose Rico’s family spoke up about their support for him and how proud they were about his leadership and courage.

That night, we renewed our commitment to this fight that at times seems endless but worth it because our dignity and humanity are priorities. To say the least, the courage of the seven undocumented youth is inspiring and the empowerment liberating. Through them we were are all able to scream and now shoulder to shoulder we free ourselves from whatever fear we may have because nothing is more contagious than courage.

Take a minute to get to know the other folks who were arrested in Georgia. They come from different parts of the country, but all stood up against the same injustice together.

[NOTE: The Georgia 7 have been released and we are no longer collecting bail money. Thank you for those who have shown your support.]

Georgina | Viridiana | Jose Rico | Dayanna | Maria | Andrea | David

Viridiana and Jose Rico were arrested yesterday in an act of civil disobedience. Right now, they are being held in an Atlanta jail.

It’ll take your help to get them out. Contribute to their bail funds here:

Viridiana | Jose Rico


 

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@NCDREAMTeam

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