You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘police’ tag.

image

Hello! My name is Alejandra. I live in Liberty, NC. I’m 18 years old and I am undocumented.

I was brought to this country when I was only 13 months old. I’ve been here basically all my life and now I have the chance to help my family! My mom has been driving without a driver’s license since 2007. In these past six years, she hasn’t been able to go out anywhere without being afraid of getting pulled over. She’s gotten pulled over twice already. But what can she do? She has to work in order for us to eat and she can’t be looking for a ride all the time. Everyone has their own life and we can’t always be looking for people to take us places.
This is why I can’t wait to get my pink license! I don’t like the idea that everyone who I show my driver’s license to will know my immigration status. The truth is I’m tired though. I’m tired of hiding that I am undocumented. My immigration status does not determine my worth. As of March 25th, I too will drive without fear! I wont be scared when a cop pulls up behind me on my my way to work, afraid he’ll check my plate to find that I’ve been previously pulled over for no driver’s license . More importantly, I’ll be able to drive my mom where she needs to go. Pink stripe or no pink stripe, I’m ready for my driver’s license!

Below is a letter from Jeff to Time Warner Cable in support of Lorena Yanez-Mata, immigrant mother now facing deportation after a company representative turned her in to the police after setting up and paying for cable service. If you think this is wrong, you too can pledge to unsubscribe from TWC. Send us your letters to TWC at dreamteamnc@gmail.com. Thanks for your support! 

Dear Mr. Stanley and Ms. Leepson,

My name is Jeff Shaw, and earlier this week I found myself in one of those situations where the timing makes you wonder if something was meant to happen.

Currently, I have Frontier Internet. Their service is awful. On a good day I get 3mbps download speed, and those good days are few. Since Frontier took over from Verizon in Durham, I’ve been really displeased.

On Monday, my girlfriend and I finally decided we’d had it and were going to make the switch to Time Warner. I made the call. I gleefully anticipated download speeds approaching 30 mbps, not 3. Given that your two companies are my only two options, I felt it was a no-brainer — especially because the prices are comparable.

Then, I read this: http://action.dreamactivist.org/northcarolina/lorena/

Is it really Time Warner Cable’s policy to turn in undocumented people so they can be arrested and deported?

I think this incident is outrageous, especially since the outcome involves the likely deportation of a young mother who hasn’t committed any crime. This will split up her family and leave a seven-year-old motherless. I could get into the broader immigration policy ramifications, but the main thing is this: it seems that your company took the initiative in destroying this family’s life.

If this is not your policy — if it were the actions of a rogue employee — I would suggest TWC immediately move to condemn this deportation and discipline the employee. If TWC doesn’t send a clear statement in this regard, it will be difficult to prevent another such tragedy.

If this *is* your policy, please let me assure you that I’m not the only one who finds it reprehensible.

In conclusion, let me be clear: Your company has a better product at comparable prices. I am addicted to the Internet and slow download speeds are really frustrating for me. I was ready to make the switch.

But I’d rather put up with bad service and a poor product than support a company that wants to deport my friends and neighbors. Until Time Warner Cable takes steps to make this right, I can’t in good conscience use your service.

Sincerely,

Jeff Shaw

image by S. Pavey

Since June 2010, the Department of Justice announced its investigation on “allegations of discriminatory policing and unconstitutional searches and seizures.” Today, September 18th, 2012 this very investigation has reached its climax by publishing its findings. Alamance County Sheriff Terry Johnson has in his part repeatedly denied such claims.

Among these findings, these practices are found:

  • ACSO deputies target Latino drivers for traffic stops;
  • A study of ACSO’s traffic stops on three major county roadways found that deputies were between four and 10 times more likely to stop Latino drivers than non-Latino drivers;
  • ACSO deputies routinely locate checkpoints just outside Latino neighborhoods, forcing residents to endure police checks when entering or leaving their communities;
  • ACSO practices at vehicle checkpoints often vary based on a driver’s ethnicity.   Deputies insist on examining identification of Latino drivers, while allowing drivers of other ethnicities to pass through without showing identification;
  • ACSO deputies arrest Latinos for minor traffic violations while issuing citations or warnings to non-Latinos for the same violations;
  • ACSO uses jail booking and detention practices, including practices related to immigration status checks, that discriminate against Latinos;
  • The sheriff and ACSO’s leadership explicitly instruct deputies to target Latinos with discriminatory traffic stops and other enforcement activities;
  • The sheriff and ACSO leadership foster a culture of bias by using anti-Latino epithets; and
  • ACSO engages in substandard reporting and monitoring practices that mask its discriminatory conduct.

We, the NC Dream Team, have been approached by many community members in Alamance County because of these practices, and most of the time we found ourselves working on individual cases of family members detained in this county by checkpoints, driving without a license, or simply driving while brown. Alamance County is one of seven counties in North Carolina that have 287(g) programs. This program is one of several ICE ACCESS (Agreements of Cooperation in Communities to Enhance Safety and Security) programs, “which provides local law enforcement agencies an opportunity to team with ICE to combat specific challenges in their communities.” However, as we can see in the case of Alamance County, these programs do far from “combating the challenges in our communities;” in fact, they do quiet the opposite by separating our families from their loved ones, subjecting them to mistreatment in violation of their civil rights, and in many cases having them locked up in detention centers for long periods of times before deporting them. Members of the National Immigrant Youth Alliance, our umbrella organization, have some findings on this very topic after infiltrating an immigration detention facility.

Furthermore, the Department of Homeland Security released today a statement terminating its 287(g) program in Alamance County:

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is troubled by the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) findings of discriminatory policing practices within the Alamance County Sheriff’s Office (ACSO).   Discrimination undermines law enforcement and erodes the public trust.  DHS will not be a party to such practices. Accordingly, and effective immediately, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is terminating ACSO’s 287(g) jail model agreement and is restricting their access to the Secure Communities program.  ICE will utilize federal resources for the purpose of identifying and detaining those individuals who meet ICE immigration enforcement priorities.  The Department will continue to enforce federal immigration laws in Alamance County in smart, effective ways that focus our resources on criminal aliens, recent border crossers, repeat and egregious immigration law violators and employers who knowingly hire illegal labor.

We are pleased to see the release of these findings by the DOJ and the decision taken by DHS in terminating 287 (g), but we are unimpressed. We still have 6 other counties in North Carolina that have this program and ALL COUNTIES in our state have Secure Communities, which is another type of ICE ACCESS program. Meanwhile, we still keep receiving word from families being detained for minor traffic violations; such as having a broken tail-light or being encountered by check-points organized by local police.

The Obama administration needs to come forth and terminate 287(g) in ALL COUNTIES in North Carolina and take policies like Secure Communities away. It is completely unacceptable for the Obama administration to keep empowering agencies and agents, like Alamance County’s Sheriff  Terry Johnson, that keep our communities insecure.

For the full report from DOJ visit: http://www.justice.gov/iso/opa/resources/171201291812462488198.pdf

Rep. David Price supports the DREAM Act. Unfortunately, he also supports Secure Communities, a program under which DREAMers and their families could be deported. If you have time to go to Durham tonight and speak out against the program, you should.

While the program is billed as an anti-crime initiative, the program, along with 287(g), is utilized as a dragnet against immigrants with which police can hand over any undocumented immigrant they come in contact with. This has led to several victims of domestic violence receiving deportation orders after coming forward to the police. There are questions also about the capacity of some jurisdictions to handle the additional workload that S-Comm requires.

It was recently discovered that the Department of Homeland Security was being purposefully deceptive about the voluntary nature of the Secure Communities program. In other words, in the effort to increase enforcement, the Obama Administration has found it perfectly acceptable to lie to police about their responsibilities.

The town hall will be held from 7-8:30 PM at the Durham County Main Library, 300 North Roxboro St., Durham, NC 27701.

On Friday, a Cobb County Sheriff’s deputy in Georgia was found guilty on a total of seven counts, including sodomy, rape, false imprisonment and kidnapping of a 23-year-old undocumented woman. This bastard, Jason Bill, forced a young woman to commit sexual acts at gunpoint and under the threat of deportation. What gave him the power to make good on that threat? Oh, just an agreement called 287(g).

A little over a year ago in Charlotte, NC, another police officer named Marcus Jackson sexually assaulted six women, including a seventeen-year-old girl, before the boyfriend of one of the victims went to the police. How did the Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department thank him for pointing out a disgrace to the uniform? They handed him over to ICE under 287(g).

And last year, Bedri Kulla, a former US Citizen and Immigration Services official, threatened to deport a 23-year-old woman from El Salvador who wouldn’t give him what he wanted: a sexual relationship. Kulla also attempted to contact three young female hunger strikers last summer in downtown Raleigh who chose to speak out for the DREAM Act.

Does this sound like the power you want the police in your community to have?

UPDATE: Via VivirLatino: 15,000 documents on Secure Communities have been released after litigation by the National Day Laborers Organizing Network brought forward under the Freedom of Information Act. The documents reveal blatant federal manipulation of local law enforcement as they suggest that S-Comm is involuntary.

The Secure Communities program, or S-Comm, has been adopted by the North Carolina counties of Beaufort, Carteret, Craven, Hyde, Pamlico, Tyrrell and Washington. That means 92% of North Carolina counties participate in the program. It is likely that the remaining eight counties will join in the next few weeks.

Secure Communities is a program that began in 2007 in Texas and North Carolina that allows local officials to place a detainer on individuals that police believe are in the country without a current visa. Biometric identification is used to verify the immigration status and criminal history of those arrested by local law enforcement and supposedly allows Immigration and Customs Enforcement to prioritize the deportation of violent criminals. According to the ICE website:

“If fingerprints match DHS records, ICE determines if immigration enforcement action is required, considering the immigration status of the alien, the severity of the crime and the alien’s criminal history.”

However, local jurisdictions across the country have taken issue with the program, saying that it encourages racial profiling and the deportation of a large number of non-criminals. After San Francisco requested to opt-out of the program, ICE was unsure in its response as to whether or not the program was voluntary, and which jurisdiction (either local or state) was responsible for choosing to opt-out of the program.

President Obama has stated his support for Secure Communities and hopes to expand the program over the next few years.

Donate & Subscribe

Donate here. Donations help us travel around the state and purchase materials for actions and events. You can also subscribe to our mailing list.

@NCDREAMTeam

  • @joshabla xoxoxo!#FWYH 15 hours ago
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,750 other followers

Powered by WordPress.com
%d bloggers like this: